DIY Music Branding

Branding, marketing, advertising … they’re necessary evils. Whenever I start a new project I take time to think out the image I want to project. I wish that music could just be music. I wish it could just be sound heard and not seen. But that’s naive. We live in a post-MTV world where music listeners connect their music with a lifestyle, an image, and a brand.

When I started a new beat-driven music project, I was thinking of making trancey electronica under the name of Fynix. So I created a sleek, futuristic logo based on similar designs on groups such as Odesza, and Armin van Buuren.

I’m pretty proud of it.

But after making more music, I have drifted away from trance into a more soul-influenced, keyboard-based style. So the old branding makes no sense.

So how can I connect my image with soul music and soul-inspired electronica? I started by looking at similar acts. I like this art from Faking It by Calvin Harris.

Faking It by Calvin Harris

I also like the branding for Charles Bradley. The image for Spotify Sessions is particularly nice.

Charles Bradley Spotify Sessions

I also want to connect with older soul artists like Sam Cooke and James Brown. Even though my music may not share many qualities with theirs, I want my imagery to put me in the same bucket.

Sam Cooke Wonderful World

After looking at a bunch of images of Sam Cooke, James Brown, Charles Bradley, and some electronica acts, I came up with a few guidelines.

  • Warm colors. James Brown and Sam Cooke use a lot of oranges, browns and reds on their album covers. Using the same color palette will help.
  • Cosmopolitan. Charles Bradley and other funk artists use a lot of images of the city. Maybe this is an artifact of the association with Detroit. Whatever the cause, I’d like to project a cosmopolitan image.
  • Natural Fabrics. Leather jackets are big in the Charles Bradley and James Brown branding. I don’t want a picture of myself in my branding, but if I could connect with something physical that would be good.
  • Sans Serif Fonts. Flat-colored text using basic fonts.

The funk and soul branding also prominently features portraits. Mostly artists looking at or near the camera, with strong lighting. Often the artist is wearing a suit, or a leather jacket. I might do something like this in the future, but I would need a photographer.

For now, I executed my branding guidelines pretty directly. I am from Pittsburgh, so I found a warm-colored picture of Pittsburgh on Wikimedia Commons. Then I wrote “FYNIX” in the middle using a Sans Serif font. Then I applied the newsprint effect to associate my brand with newspapers, which have a real-world physicality that unifies the ideas of the city and natural fabrics.

Here’s the result.

Fynix Branding

I like this because it is legible even when scaled very small, and it looks like the Calvin Harris branding, while subtly calling to mind soul acts of the past.